Frozen

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After a long Christmas break, I have decided to finally write a new blog post!

Over break, my family went to see the new Disney movie, Frozen.  While it would not make my list of top three Disney movies, I really enjoyed it.  With the fantastic songs and cute characters, what I loved most about Frozen was its theme of unconditional love.

The two girls, Anna and Elsa, are sisters and best friends who grow up without a care in the world.  Elsa, who has inherited an ancient power, is able to create snow and ice.  The girls use this power in their play, until an accident happens and Elsa is forced to conceal her power.

In an effort to conceal Elsa’s gift, the king and queen send away most of the servants and keep Elsa in her room.  Anna is confused about why her sister is shut up in her room.  The movie shows the sadness and loneliness Anna feels growing up without her sister.  Although Anna is lonely and feels ignored by Elsa, she does not grow bitter.  Elsa, on the other hand, feels like no one will accept her, and isolates herself in her fear.  She hurts herself and the one closest to her, Anna, because of her fear.  In the end, love wins the day when Anna sacrifices herself for Anna.

Frozen clearly shows the Biblical theme of true love throughout the movie, exhibited by characters like Anna, Olaf, and Kristoff.  In one scene, Olaf explains to Anna that true love is putting someone else’s needs above yourself.

Furthermore, this movie shows the dangers of being desperate to fall in love, like Anna.  While a girl may be infatuated with a boy, or vice versa, that does not mean that they feel “true love.”  It takes more than a conversation or a romantic moment to truly fall in love.

In conclusion, I would say Frozen is a great family movie.  The songs, humor, and characters are all very good, especially the whimsical snowman, Olaf. 

1 John 3:16

“By this we know love, that he laid down his life for us, and we ought to lay down our lives for the brothers.”
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