Frozen

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After a long Christmas break, I have decided to finally write a new blog post!

Over break, my family went to see the new Disney movie, Frozen.  While it would not make my list of top three Disney movies, I really enjoyed it.  With the fantastic songs and cute characters, what I loved most about Frozen was its theme of unconditional love.

The two girls, Anna and Elsa, are sisters and best friends who grow up without a care in the world.  Elsa, who has inherited an ancient power, is able to create snow and ice.  The girls use this power in their play, until an accident happens and Elsa is forced to conceal her power.

In an effort to conceal Elsa’s gift, the king and queen send away most of the servants and keep Elsa in her room.  Anna is confused about why her sister is shut up in her room.  The movie shows the sadness and loneliness Anna feels growing up without her sister.  Although Anna is lonely and feels ignored by Elsa, she does not grow bitter.  Elsa, on the other hand, feels like no one will accept her, and isolates herself in her fear.  She hurts herself and the one closest to her, Anna, because of her fear.  In the end, love wins the day when Anna sacrifices herself for Anna.

Frozen clearly shows the Biblical theme of true love throughout the movie, exhibited by characters like Anna, Olaf, and Kristoff.  In one scene, Olaf explains to Anna that true love is putting someone else’s needs above yourself.

Furthermore, this movie shows the dangers of being desperate to fall in love, like Anna.  While a girl may be infatuated with a boy, or vice versa, that does not mean that they feel “true love.”  It takes more than a conversation or a romantic moment to truly fall in love.

In conclusion, I would say Frozen is a great family movie.  The songs, humor, and characters are all very good, especially the whimsical snowman, Olaf. 

1 John 3:16

“By this we know love, that he laid down his life for us, and we ought to lay down our lives for the brothers.”
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Love Stories: Sleeping Beauty vs. The Little Mermaid

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Most little girls love princesses.  They love to be the princess, watch the princess movies, and play with princess dolls.  These little girls of someday having a love story like their favorite princess, and dream of a prince like those in the movies.

I was one of those little girls who dreamed of being a princess, though I would not consider myself a girly-girl.  Instead of playing with dolls and having tea-parties, I went on imaginary adventures in my backyard, or dressed up and pretended to be Belle or Cinderella.  As a little girl, I was influenced by Disney movies.  Now, I am surrounded by pop culture and movies, advertisements, songs, and celebrities grasping for my attention and allegiance.  They try to tell me what I should want my life to be like.

In many ways, the world wants us girls to be like Ariel, or the Little Mermaid, who rebelled to find her happiness.  She wanted more than what she had been given, though she lived in a wonderful world as the daughter of a loving king.  She gave up her voice, and ultimately her family, to find life and love.

I would rather be like the sleeping beauty, Princess Aurora.  This may sound strange, after all, she was tricked by a wicked witch into pricking her finger and falling into a deep sleep.  She wasn’t independent, and she was lucky that her prince found her.

Contrary to what many may think, there are many reasons why I would rather be like the sleeping beauty than the little mermaid.

Ariel was born a princess, with a loving family and beautiful kingdom.  She was gifted with a beautiful voice and vivacious personality, making many friends under the sea.  However, she was not content with her life.  She wanted to see what the human world was like, with all its “gadgets and gizmos a plenty.”

After rescuing the handsome Prince Eric, Ariel fell in love with him.  She did not love him because of his character but because he was human and handsome.  Because she was so in love, she went to the sea-witch, Ursula, to be transformed into a human.  The witch’s price for this transformation was Ariel’s voice, her greatest gift.  To remain human, Ariel had to make Prince Eric fall in love with her and kiss her.

Ariel is taken in by the prince as an act of charity, and they spend their days together.  Ariel has to work to attract Eric’s attention, though he is already attracted to her, and he does not realize how much he likes her until they go on a romantic boat ride.

In an attempt to keep Ariel from reaching her goal, Ursula transforms herself into a lovely, seductive woman, who has Ariel’s voice.  Immediately, Eric falls under the spell of her voice, which is the voice of the girl who saved him.  He prepares to marry this new woman, who is actually Ursula.

In the end, Ariel defeats Ursula and marries Prince Eric.  However, I would definitely want to have a love story like hers.

Ariel gave up a wonderful life where she was respected and love to try to earn the love of a prince.  Though this prince was handsome and kind, he was not very virtuous.  He fell for the pretty girl, though she did not have a good character.  Ariel nearly lost everything because of her rebellious decisions.  In contrast is the story of the sleeping beauty, Princess Aurora.

From the day she was born, Aurora was loved.  Her parents hoped and prayed for a child, and she was born.  A little while after her birth, they threw a party to celebrate her life.  People from all over the kingdom were invited.  She was given gifts of beauty, grace, and kindness by sweet fairies.  Then, she was cursed by a witch to prick her finger on the spindle of a spinning wheel, and die on her sixteenth birthday.  The witch hated her family because she was jealous of their power.

In the panic of the moment, the last fairy stepped forward to change the curse so that the young princess would not die, but only fall into a sleep that would be broken by love’s first kiss.

Though the princess was protected by the fairy’s magic, her father loved her so much that he burned all the spinning wheels in the kingdom to protect her from her dreaded fate.  Then, in an ultimate sacrifice, her parents let Aurora be taken into hiding in the care of the fairies.

Only parents who truly loved their daughter would be willing to sacrifice so much to save her.  I would hope to have such a family as this, who not only would love me before my birth, but would be willing to protect me no matter the sacrifice.

Second of all, the princess was married to a man who was truly virtuous.  Aurora was betrothed from birth to Prince Philip, the son of a neighboring king.  Her parents would not have promised her to just any man.  They must have known that the king was a good man and would train his son to be a good man.  Philip’s virtue was proven when he faced the hardest of obstacles to rescue the princess.

First, Philip was kidnapped by the witch so that he could not save the princess.  Then, when the fairy’s freed him, instead of abandoning the princess because of the possible danger, he went on to save her.  He was not stopped by the hedge of thorns around the castle, nor by the witch-turned-dragon guarding the gate.  He fought courageously, and was finally able to rescue the princess.

I do hope to one day be married, though my story probably does not involve a prince.  I want my parents’ direction and approval.  I pray that I find a young man full of virtue, willing to sacrifice himself for other’s benefit.

That is why I hope to have a story more like Aurora’s than Ariel’s.  Though it will not be as glamorous as a fairy tale by any means, I am sure it will have it’s own glamor.

Life may not be perfect, but it’s worth living to glorify God.